Default welcome msg!

HO or H0 is the most popular scale of model railway in the world. According to the National Model Railroad Association (NMRA) standard S-1.2 predominantly used in North America, in HO scale, 3.5 mm (0.1378 in) represents 1 real foot (304.8 mm); this ratio works out to 1:87.0857142, usually rounded to 1:87.1.[3] According to the MOROP standard NEM 010 predominantly used in Europe, the scale is exactly 1:87.[4] In HO, rails are spaced 16.5 mm (0.64961 in) apart which models the standard railroad gauge of 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in).[5] The name HO is derived from the fact that its 1:87 scale is approximately half that of 0 scale which was the smallest of the series of older and larger 0, 1, 2 and 3 scales introduced by Märklin around 1900. In most English-speaking markets it is pronounced "aitch-oh" and written with the letters HO today, but in German it is pronounced "hah-null", and still written with the letter H and numeral 0. After the First World War there were several attempts to introduce a model railway about half the size of 0 scale that would be more suitable for smaller home layouts and cheaper to manufacture. H0 was created to meet these aims. For this new scale, a track width of 16.5 mm was designed to represent prototypical standard gauge track, and a model scale of 1:87 was chosen. By as early as 1922 the firm Bing in Nuremberg, Germany, had been marketing a "tabletop railway" for several years. This came on a raised, quasi-ballasted track with a gauge of 16.5 mm, which was described at that time either as 00 or H0. The trains initially had a clockwork drive, but from 1924 were driven electrically. Accessory manufacturers, such as Kibri, marketed buildings in the corresponding scale.

Items 1 to 12 of 1608 total

per page
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5

Grid List

Set Descending Direction

HO/OO

Items 1 to 12 of 1608 total

per page
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5

Grid List

Set Descending Direction